OSHA Training

The federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration sets rules for hazards in the workplace, particularly in construction and manufacturing. Avoid costly fines by having the right training plans in place. OSHA can show up at a business without warning and can hand out heavy fines. Your employees have the right to see a compliance plan for their company.

The plans should cover at least the following:

  • A workplace that is free from serious, recognized hazards and complies with standards issued under the OSHA Act.
  • Assurance that employees have and use safe tools and equipment and properly maintain this equipment.

Take Action

  • Conduct safety inspections Walk through your business and check all chemical container labels, fuse boxes, fire extinguishers, noise levels, air quality levels and obstructed views. Make sure that desk chairs and computer work stations are ergonomically compliant. Tornado, fire, flood and earthquake procedures and evacuation routes or shelters must be clearly posted.
  • Identify hazards Asking yourself WHAT IF questions is an effective way to assess workplace potential for chemical, physical, ergonomic and biological hazards. Make a check list of hazard violations and the date each was corrected.
  • Establish safety rules Regularly review rules with your employees to determine if they are not only understandable but absolutely necessary. Too many safety rules can cause employees to ignore them.
  • Train employees New employees should complete training upon being hired, and all employees should participate in annual safety training.
  • Implement thorough record keeping and reporting systems With a few exceptions for specific industries, most companies with 11 or more employees must keep injury and illness records.
  • Purchase a copy of national OSHA guidelines and those for your state. Read up and know what OSHA requires. Inspect and correct all recognizable health and accident hazards. Review workplace regulations for clarity and necessity and thoroughly train all current employees and new hires. Prominently post safety regulations and emergency procedures. Keep an accurate accounting of work related incidents for each employee.

Hazard Communication

The following information of hazardous materials training is the guideline for our course. However, OSTS will address the following issues in a site-specific manner to ensure applicability of information. Our instructors not only cover the required elements, but use Tabletop and Practical exercises to further enhance the value of the class.

Program Development

OSTS will develop your Hazard Communications Program as required by Cal OSHA, CCR Title 8 Section 5194. The program will include all necessary policies and procedures.

Program Implementation

Training for Safety Director and /or Committee on how to implement and manage the program. Course takes approximately 1.5 hours.

Employee Orientation

This session will ensure that all employees understand their responsibility as it relates to the company’s Hazard Communications Program safety plan. This course takes 60 minutes.

Hazard Communication Employee Training

This training session will ensure that the students understand the potential for exposure and their liability and responsibility as it relates to the company’s Hazard Communication Program. Individuals who participate in this training will be given a comprehensive overview of the Standard, your written policies and procedures, Material Safety Data Sheets, appropriate hazard labeling, and the “Employee Right-To-Know” (Prop. 65) information. Participants will receive materials/handouts needed to assist in subject retention.

Class will last approximately 45mins to 1 hour. The session will consist of lecture, handouts and video presentation.

Hazard Communication Standard.

This standard is designed to ensure that employers and employees know about hazardous chemicals in the workplace and how to protect themselves. Employers with employees who may be exposed to hazardous chemicals in the workplace must prepare and implement a written Hazard Communication Program and comply with other requirements of the standard.

Emergency Action Plan

Cal OSHA’s regulatory reference is CCR Title 8 Section 3220 &3221

Emergency Action Plan Documentation: (CCR Title 8 Section 3220)

This is the foundation of every company’s emergency action plan. The effectiveness of emergency response is everyone’s co-operation and assistance. Through the development of this document we will set the expectations and responsibilities of all personnel within your facility whether they are directly or indirectly assigned duties in the event of an emergency. Responsible Groups may include, but not be limited to, Incident Command, Facility Safety, First Aid response, Hazardous Material response, communications & recovery.

Fire Prevention Plan Documentation: (CCR Title 8 Section 3221)

Designed in concert with Emergency Action Plan. This is a required, proactive part of emergency preparedness. This plan will structure the inspection and abatement of fire related hazards within your facility. Personnel will be assigned duties within this plan.

Emergency Action Plan Implementation

Training for the designated individuals to help create a smoother transition for implementation of your program. This session involves all assigned personnel in a “round table” type setting to discuss their responsibilities, their concerns and potential modifications to the plan based on unrecognised hazards. We will also identify needs for additional emergency equipment and safety training. We will also help establish procedures for emergency drills and identify evacuation “Safe Zones”. Course duration approximately 90 to 120 minutes.

Emergency Evacuation Map Development

OSTS will develop computer-designed maps of your facility which will display emergency equipment, routes of exit, Safe Zone(s), etc. We can develop maps by free-hand draw or use electronic files of facility maps that you have already developed. Providing electronic files may reduce the overall cost of map development. Evacuation maps are NOT drawn to scale, they are drawn proportionally.

Emergency Action Plan Employee Orientation

Training for employees that are not assigned specific duties within the plan. Employees will be given an overview of the current plan of action and what is expected of them during a specific emergency (i.e. earthquake, fire, chemical release, etc.). Also, employees may be “Walked Through” their primary routes of exit and assembled at the safe zone (If time allows). Course duration approximately 30 to 45 minutes.

Working Surfaces

Slips Trips and Falls

Slips Trips and Falls are the single most common cause of accidents in the workplace.

Over a third of all reported accidents are caused by slips and trips. This forty-five minute to one hour class will help reduce the risk of the amount of accidents occurring through everyday tasks.

Topics covered but not limited to:

  • Potential Hazards
  • Importance of Proper Maintenance
  • Cleaning Procedures and
  • Many other aspects of slips and falls prevention.

First Aid

CPR First Aid Certification

CPR 2000™ follows CPR guidelines as presented by the Journal of the American Medical Association, American Heart Association and recommendations by the national guidelines for first aid training in occupational settings (NGFATOS). Our goal is to provide the most effective life saving techniques class possible while fulfilling OSHA requirements for basic first aid providers in the workplace.

The Core training course is 4 hours, however, hours may increase depending on the number of students and specific curriculum modifications (i.e. bloodborne pathogens, AED, triage, etc).

This course is a 2 year certification in both CPR and First Aid.

CPR 2000™ focuses on information and procedures that a first aid provider should know. We avoid complicated (although interesting) medical procedures, theories and fun facts, as they may confuse the real issues. Real issues include how to recognize a medical emergency and what to do in the first crucial minutes.

Emphasis in this course is on the development of the Primary and Secondary Essential Skills of Patient Care: SETUP, Primary Assessment, One Rescuer CPR, Choking Management, Control of Bleeding, Shock Management, Illness Assessment and Injury Assessment. Students of this course learn the skills of patient care in the same sequence they are actually used.

Additionally, during the course, students will participate in many hands-on exercises to help ensure a complete understanding and retention of material.

Student handout materials include: User-friendly student guide, gloves, manikin mouth shield, pocket reminder card, 9-1-1 Info card, certification card, and wall certificate. Classes can be taught in English or Spanish. Please specify your needs when booking a class.

The following is deemed to be the minimal acceptable first-aid and CPR training program for employees engaged in logging activities.

First-aid and CPR training shall be conducted using the conventional methods of training such as lecture, demonstration, practical exercise and examination (both written and practical). The length of training must be sufficient to assure that trainees understand the concepts of first aid and can demonstrate their ability to perform the various procedures contained in the outline below.

At a minimum, first-aid and CPR training shall consist of the following:

  • The definition of first aid.
  • Legal issues of applying first aid (Good Samaritan Laws).
  • Basic anatomy.
  • Patient assessment and first aid for the following:
    • Respiratory arrest.
    • Cardiac arrest.
    • Hemorrhage.
    • Lacerations/abrasions.
    • Amputations.
    • Musculoskeletal injuries.
    • Shock.
    • Eye injuries.
    • Burns.
    • Loss of consciousness.
    • Extreme temperature exposure (hypothermia / hyper- thermia)
    • Paralysis.
    • Poisoning.
    • Loss of mental functioning (psychosis/hallucinations, etc.).
    • Artificial ventilation.
    • Drug overdose.
  • CPR.
  • Application of dressings and slings.
  • Treatment of strains, sprains, and fractures.
  • Immobilization of injured persons.
  • Handling and transporting injured persons.
  • Treatment of bites, stings, or contact with poisonous plants or animals.

Machine Guarding

Occupational Safety Training Systems offers your company a convenient way to meet your OSHA 29 CFR 1910.212 requirements regarding Machine Safeguard Training.

Our Machine Safeguard Training Program helps employees increase their efficiency, while lowering your company’s liability cost related to workplace injuries.

A trained, certified instructor will conduct training that meets Cal OSHA specifications either in English or Spanish at your facility.

Machine Safeguard Training requires approximately forty-five minutes to one-hour (1) of instruction combined with a written examination (Time can fluctuate based on number of students).

Topics covered in the class:

  • Identifying Hazards
  • Controlling Hazards
  • Safeguarding Methods
  • Types of Guards
  • Types of Devices
  • Clothing & Jewelry Restrictions
  • Lockout/Tagout Procedures
  • Preventative Maintenance

Lockout Tagout

Many Employers do not realize that it is required to develop a “Specific” Energy Control Procedure for each piece of equipment that exposes employees to hazardous energy while cleaning, servicing, maintaining, adjusting, unjamming, or setting up Cal OSHA’s regulatory reference is CCR Title 8 Sections:

  • 3314. Cleaning, Repairing, Servicing and Adjusting Prime Movers, Machinery and Equipment
  • 3340. Accident Prevention Signs
  • 3341. Accident Prevention Tags

This training session will ensure that the students understand the potential for exposure and their liability and responsibility as it relates to the company’s Lockout Tagout Program. Individuals who participate in this training will be given a comprehensive overview of the Standard, your written policies and procedures and how energized machines and equipment affect their daily activities. Key points that will be cover in this course include:

  • The control of hazardous energy must be done according to a six-step procedure:
    • Preparation for shutdown
    • Equipment shutdown
    • Equipment isolation
    • Application of lockout tagout devices
    • Control of stored energy
    • Equipment-isolation verification
  • Before removing the lock:
    • Make sure equipment is safe
    • Conduct a head count
    • Notify all affected personnel that lockout is being removed.
  • Special situations to be aware of:
    • Outside contractors
    • Temporarily reactivating equipment
    • Servicing that lasts more than one shift
    • Removal of lockout by personnel who did not apply it

    Participants will receive materials/handouts needed to assist in subject retention. Class will last approximately 1 hour for “Affected” personnel and 2 hours for an introduction to “Authorized” personnel. The session for “Authorized” individuals can last many hours when specific energy controls procedures are being discussed and explained. The session may consist of lecture, handouts, powerpoint and video presentation.


    The Lockout Tagout Standard requires the following issues to be addressed:

    • Conduct an Evaluation of potential energy sources your employees may be exposed
    • Develop a formal Written Policy
    • Assign “Authorized” Personnel
    • Develop Energy Control Procedures per piece of equipment
    • * Acquire necessary locks, tags, and locking devices
    • Conduct Training for Employees – “Authorized” and “Affected”
    • Establish Procedures To Maintain The Program

    * To be provided by a safety equipment supplier

    All training is performed in accordance with Federal OSHA, applicable State-chartered OSHA, and other State Regulations and local Ordinances.

Personal Protective Equipment

This program is designed to assist employers in meeting the OSHA requirements for the selection, use and maintenance of personal protective equipment. Employees will be trained in the requirements for the proper use and the selection of personal protective equipment, such as for eyes, face, head, hands, feet, clothing, and respiratory devices in their jobs.

Class approximately 45 minutes. Can be taught in English or Spanish.

All training is performed in accordance with Federal OSHA, applicable State-chartered OSHA, and other State Regulations and local Ordinances.

Electrical

Low Voltage Electrical Safety Training

Electrical Safety Principles and Procedures targets employees who perform work on or near electrical equipment and systems energized up to 600 volts and focuses on the electrical safe work practices required by Cal/OSHA. This intensive one-day course includes OSHA Standards, Hazards of Electricity, Protection Devices, Personal Protective Equipment, Grounding, Safe Work Practices, and the Approach Boundaries and other applicable sections of NFPA 70E. It is also offered as a one-day refresher course.

Anyone who works on or near power generation, transmission, or distribution systems should attend this course. Additionally, supervisors, managers, safety personnel, and those responsible for ensuring a safe work environment should attend this course. Course covers CAL OSHA Title 8 Chapter 5 Low and High Voltage Safety Orders.

Topics to be covered:

  • OSHA and Consensus Group Standards
  • Hazards and Effects of Electrical Shock
  • Personnel Protection Devices
  • Equipment Protection Devices
  • Grounding
  • Safe Work Practices
  • NFPA 70E
  • Electrically Safe Work Condition
  • PPE Requirements
  • Installation Requirements
  • Maintenance Requirements
  • Inspections and Documentation

 

OSHA Quick Tips

Assume that all overhead wires are energized at lethal voltages. Never assume that a wire is safe to touch even if it is down or appears to be insulated. Never touch a fallen overhead power line. Call the electric utility company to report fallen electrical lines. Stay at least 10 feet (3 meters) away from overhead wires during cleanup and other activities. If working at heights or handling long objects, survey the area before starting work for the presence of overhead wires.

If an overhead wire falls across your vehicle while you are driving, stay inside the vehicle and continue to drive away from the line. If the engine stalls, do not leave your vehicle. Warn people not to touch the vehicle or the wire. Call or ask someone to call the local electric utility company and emergency services.

Never operate electrical equipment while you are standing in water. Never repair electrical cords or equipment unless qualified and authorized.

Have a qualified electrician inspect electrical equipment that has gotten wet before energizing it.

If working in damp locations, inspect electric cords and equipment to ensure that they are in good condition and free of defects, and use a ground-fault circuit interrupter (GFCI).

Always use caution when working near electricity.

Source OSHA

All training is performed in accordance with Federal OSHA, applicable State-chartered OSHA, and other State Regulations and local Ordinances.

Respirators

Respiratory Protection Employee
Training and Fit Testing

This training session will ensure that the students understand the potential for exposure and their liability and responsibility as it relates to the company’s Respiratory Protection Program.

Individuals who participate in this training will understand the Cal OSHA Standard, your written policies and procedures, the need for protection, how to maintain and clean the respirator, and how to perform positive and negative fit checks. Finally the students will be fit tested using a Cal OSHA listed quantitative method.

The fit test protocol to be used is Controlled Negative Pressure (CNP). CNP fit testing is, currently the most accurate form of fit testing. (Prior to Fit Testing, employees MUST have a documented release form from your consulting physician).

Participants will receive handouts needed to assist in subject retention. The project will be conducted in two separate modules: 1) training classes and 2) fit test sessions. Students will participate in the training class module (approximately 1 hour), then proceed to the fit test station.

All training is performed in accordance with Federal OSHA, applicable State-chartered OSHA, and other State Regulations and local Ordinances.

Hearing Conservation

Mobile Audiometric Testing

Hearing Tests as Required by OSHA AT YOUR FACILITY

OSTS offers Hearing Conservation-related services that include Hearing Conservation Program development, Noise Dosimetry testing, Hearing Conservation training for employees, and mobile hearing testing. With experienced Technicians and Doctors, we provide assistance to industries who are attempting to comply with current State/Fed OSHA regulations.

* On-Site Services
By bringing our staff and equipment to you, you save time and money by minimizing downtime. The process of sending your employees to a local clinic for testing carries EXTREME liability for your company. Even if the clinic conducted your testing at no cost, the liability of having your employees driving our public highways on Company time is immeasurable.

* Professional Service
We use computer-based microprocessor audiometers eliminating human error. Our medical equipment is calibrated daily. Quality Assurance personnel review efficiency and maintenance reports. We use certified and licensed technicians to staff our modern mobile testing units to ensure your compliance.

* Quick Reference Reports
Computerized test results and employer quick reference reports outline, in detail, specific findings and recommendations.

* Data Management
Pre-employment auditory tests can be sent directly to us for review and direct entry into our database for future Baseline comparisons.

* Maximize Protection
Our service is designed to minimize the detrimental effects of excessive industrial noise exposure by monitoring affected employees to determine if changes are occurring. Slight changes can be observed and appropriate action taken to significantly reduce potential compensation claims.

All training is performed in accordance with Federal OSHA, applicable State-chartered OSHA, and other State Regulations and local Ordinances.

Confined Space

Confined Space Training

The following information regarding confined space training is the guideline for our course. However, OSTS will address acquire and address site-specific hazards in a manner to ensure applicability of information. Our instructors not only cover the required elements, but use Tabletop and Practical exercises to further enhance the effectiveness of the class.

Confined Space Entry Training

This eight to twelve-hour Confined Space Entry course is designed to give the student the knowledge, skill, and reference material needed to safely be assigned as a Confined Space Entrant and / or Attendant.

The course involves an in-depth study of the Confined Space regulation, including the definition of a “Permit-Required” and a “Non-Permit” confined space. Additionally, students will be taught the safety requirements needed to provide a “Permit” for a Space and to conduct atmospheric testing. The material is presented in a fashion to facilitate learning. The students will receive a Reference Manual for use after the class. Tests will be given to all students who participate in the class. Students must pass the test before receiving Certificate of Participation for entry of “Confined Spaces”. Course curriculum meets or exceeds the training requirements specified by OSHA.

NOTE: The Employer must perform an annual review of all cancelled permits..

Other topics discussed include:

  • Appropriate equipping of personnel and space with safety / rescue devices
  • Proper Lockout / Tagout / Blockout of all necessary energy sources and machinery
  • Selection of proper personal
  • protective equipment
  • Required Non-entry rescue equipment and responsibilities
  • Overview of requirements for an Entry Rescue team
  • Hands-On Training
  • Fall Protection requirements
  • Air Monitoring requirements
  • Set up of proper ventilation

Click here for information on our Confined Space Awareness Course

All training is performed in accordance with Federal OSHA, applicable State-chartered OSHA, and other State Regulations and local Ordinances.

Forklifts

Forklift Operator Safety Training

Occupational Safety Training Systems offers your company a convenient way to meet your OSHA requirements regarding Forklift Safety for Forklift Operators.

Our Forklift Safety Training Program helps operators increase efficiency, lowers maintenance cost for equipment and reduces product, or material damage. Topics covered in class.

  • Engineering Principles
  • Safe Operating Rules
  • Operator Maintenance
  • Performance Testing

 

OSHA Forklift Traning

A trained, certified instructor will conduct training that meets Cal OSHA 3668 specifications either in English or Spanish at your facility. We cannot do bilingual classes.

Forklift Safety Training and Certification requires approximately four (4) hours of instruction combined with a written examination, video and practical evaluation. (Time can fluctuate based on number of students).

Note: This course is not designed to teach a new person how to operate a forklift. The purpose is to inform or refresh experienced operators on important safety principles as required by Cal-OSHA. V To become an Instructor, ask about our Forklift Train-The-Trainer program.

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) investigations of forklift-related deaths indicate that many workers and employers may not be aware of the risks of operating or working near forklifts and are not following the procedures set forth in OSHA standards, consensus standards, or equipment manufacturer’s guidelines. Generally, reducing the risk of forklift incidents requires comprehensive worker training, systematic traffic management, a safe work environment, a safe forklift, and safe work practices. The following references aid in recognizing and controlling some of the hazards associated with powered industrial trucks (PIT).

Potential Hazards

Preventing Injuries and Deaths of Workers Who Operate or Work Near Forklifts. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 2001-109, (2001, June). Includes iforklift fatality data, current standards, case reports, recommendations, and instructs workers in the steps they can take to protect themselves. Youth and Labor: Hazardous Jobs. US Department of Labor (DOL). Provides links to federal and state sites related to hazardous occupations for young workers.

Case Studies

Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE) Program: Index of In-house FACE Investigative Reports. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Includes reports on investigations of fatal occupational injuries.

Fatal Accident Summary Report: Struck and Crushed By a Backing Forklift While Cleaning Up an Auto Salvage Yard. FACE 8418.

Order Selector Dies After Jumping 16 Feet From an Elevated Pallet on an Overturning Forklift in South Carolina. FACE 9124.

Press Operator Dies After Forklift Rams Scrap Bin– North Carolina. FACE 9604.

Supply Motorman Killed by Load Falling from a Forklift. FACE 8412.

Seventeen-Year-Old Warehouse Laborer Dies After the Forklift He Was Operating Tipped Over and Crushed Him—Arizona. FACE 2002-02.

Seventeen-Year-Old Laborer at Salvage Lumber Operation Crushed by Forklift That Tipped Over – New York. FACE 2000-22.

Sixteen-Year-Old Laborer At a Building Supply Center Crushed by Forklift That Tipped Over – Ohio. FACE 2000-09.

Possible Solutions

Protecting Young Workers: Prohibition Against Young Workers Operating Forklifts. OSHA Safety and Health Information Bulletin (SHIB) 03-09-30, (2003, September 30). Informs employers that youth employment regulations (29 CFR 570) promulgated under the Fair Labor Standards Act prohibit most employees under the age of 18 years from operating forklifts for non-agricultural operations and reminds employers that all forklift operators must be trained and certified.

Preventing Injuries and Deaths of Workers Who Operate or Work Near Forklifts. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 2001-109, (2001, June). Includes information on forklift fatality data, current standards, case reports, recommendations, and instructs workers in the steps they can take to protect themselves.

Departmentwide Program Evaluation of the Hazardous Materials Transportation Programs: Final Report. US Department of Transportation (DOT), (2000, March), 297 KB PDF, 172 pages.

All training is performed in accordance with Federal OSHA, applicable State-chartered OSHA, and other State Regulations and local Ordinances.

CPR Training

Introductory Forklift Safety

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