Programs & Training for General and Construction Industry

Injury and Illness Prevention

Injury and Illness Prevention

Injury and Illness Prevention Program Development

OSTS will develop your “Company-Specific” Injury and Illness Prevention Program as required by Cal OSHA, CCR Title 8 Section 3203. For those in the Construction Industry, policy modifications will be made to meet the additional requirements of CCR Title 8 Section 1509 and 1510.  The program will include all necessary policies and procedures, including forms to assist in accomplishing and documenting safety activities. The program has been “tested” by Cal OSHA and found sufficient in meeting the requirements of CCR Title 8 Section 3203, 1509, and 1510. This IIPP will include industry-specific Codes of Safe Practice (manufacturing, warehouse/distribution, construction, etc.) as per your specific environment. The focus of the program development will be ease of management. Ease of management is critical in ensuring continuance of activities even through changes in personnel.

Injury and Illness Prevention Program Implementation

OSTS offers training for the Safety Manager and Committee members on how to implement and manage the program, conduct safety inspections, conduct employee orientation, select training subjects, conduct and document a safety committee meeting, and assign responsibility.  Also included is an overview of how to tailor policies and codes of safe practice. Course duration approximately 1.5 hours.

Injury and Illness Prevention Program Employee Orientation

This training session will ensure that your employees understand their responsibility related to the safety program and how to actively participate. OSTS will also communicate the pertinent policies and procedures regarding the operation of the program to ensure that your program is valid per Cal OSHA requirements. Course duration approximately forty-five to sixty minutes.

All training is performed in accordance with OSHA and other State Regulations and local Ordinances.

Lockout/Tagout

Lockout Tagout Blockout Safety

Many employers do not realize that it is required to develop a “Specific” Energy Control Procedure for each piece of equipment that exposes employees to hazardous energy while cleaning, servicing, maintaining, adjusting, unjamming, or setting up.

Cal OSHA’s regulatory references are CCR Title 8 Sections:

3314. Cleaning, Repairing, Servicing and Adjusting Prime Movers, Machinery and Equipment

3340. Accident Prevention Signs

3341. Accident Prevention Tags

Fed OSHA’s regulatory reference is 29 CFR 1910.147

OSTS provides training sessions that will ensure that all facets of the Lockout Tagout Blockout Standard requirements are clearly understood.

General Program Development – OSTS can develop your general Lockout Tagout Blockout policy as required by OSHA.   This is the general document and does not include development of machine-specific Energy Control Procedures (ECPs).  The general program will include an ECP form to enable your employees to develop ECPs on your own.

Energy Control Procedure Development Class – A select group of your employees, typically maintenance personnel, can participate in this course where they will learn how to develop Energy Control Procedures.  This class includes classroom lecture, classroom tabletop exercises, and actual hands-on exercises where students will develop procedures for your machines and come back to the classroom to critique and correct.

Authorized Level training – This training will assist the students in understanding the potential for exposure and their liability and responsibility as it relates to the company’s Lockout Tagout Program. If equipment-specific ECPs do not exist, students may want to participate in the ECP development course prior to participating in an Authorized Level course.  Individuals who participate in this training will be given a comprehensive overview of the Regulatory Standard, your written policies and procedures and how energized machines and equipment affect their daily activities. Key points that will be covered in this course include:

The control of hazardous energy must be done according to a six-step procedure:

  • Preparation for shutdown
  • Equipment shutdown
  • Equipment isolation
  • Application of lockout tagout devices
  • Control of stored energy
  • Equipment-isolation verification

Before removing the lock:

  • Make sure equipment is safe
  • Conduct a head count
  • Notify all affected personnel that lockout is being removed

Special situations to be aware of:

  • Outside contractors
  • Temporarily reactivating equipment
  • Servicing that lasts more than one shift
  • Removal of lockout by personnel who did not apply it

Participants will receive materials/handouts needed to assist in subject retention. The session for “Authorized” individuals can last many hours when specific energy controls procedures are being discussed and explained.

Affected Level Training – This class is designed to provide an awareness level of information to those employees who will not be involved in the Lockout Tagout processes and procedures.  This is required training to ensure that Affected Level employees do not attempt to bypass any locked out and tagged out equipment.


The Lockout Tagout Standard requires the following issues to be addressed:

1. Conduct an Evaluation of potential energy sources your employees may be exposed

2. Develop a formal Written Policy

3. Assign “Authorized” Personnel

4. Develop Energy Control Procedures per piece of equipment

5. * Acquire necessary locks, tags, and locking devices

6. Conduct Training for Employees – “Authorized” and “Affected”

7. Establish Procedures To Maintain The Program

* To be acquired from a safety equipment supplier

All training is performed in accordance with Federal OSHA, applicable State-chartered OSHA, and other State Regulations and local Ordinances.

Hazard Communication

Hazard Communication

(Globally Harmonized System / GHS)

OSTS provides full support for our clients as it relates to the Hazard Communication Standard requirements.

This standard is designed to ensure that employers and employees know about hazardous chemicals in the workplace and how to protect themselves. Employers with employees who may be exposed to hazardous chemicals in the workplace must prepare and implement a written Hazard Communication Program and comply with all other requirements of the standard.

Regulatory Requirement Summary

Hazard Communication Standard – CCR Title 8 Section 5194 (California OSHA), 29 CFR 1910.1200 (Federal OSHA)

Who does it apply to:

  • All employers who have employees who work with hazardous chemicals / substances

Major Standard requirements

  • Chemical Usage Evaluation
  • Written Policies and Procedures Development
  • Update/Acquisition of Safety Data Sheets (SDSs)
  • Acceptance of Labeling System
  • Initial Employee Training/Right-To-Know
  • Program Maintenance
    • Maintenance of container labeling
    • Maintenance of SDSs / Chemical Inventory
    • Effective employee re-training

Chemical usage evaluation – OSTS consultants will assist you with the identification and organization of hazardous substances used within your operation.

Program Development – OSTS will develop your Hazard Communications Program as required by Cal OSHA, CCR Title 8 Section 5194. The program will include all necessary policies and procedures.

Program Implementation – Training for Safety Director and /or Committee on how to implement and manage the program. Includes Safety Data Sheet acquisition advice, labeling system adoption advice, and hazard substance management advice.

Hazard Communication Employee Training – This training session will ensure that the students understand the potential for exposure and their liability and responsibility as it relates to the company’s Hazard Communication Program. Individuals who participate in this training will be given a comprehensive overview of the Standard, your written policies and procedures, Safety Data Sheets (SDS), appropriate hazard labeling, and the “Employee Right-To-Know” (Prop. 65) information. Participants will receive materials/handouts needed to assist in subject retention.

Training sessions may consist of lecture, powerpoint presentations, handouts, video presentation, student exercises, hands-on exercises, and quizzes / examinations.   Each subject that OSTS presents may include one or more of the teaching methods listed.

Emergency Action

Emergency Action Plan

 Regulatory Requirement Summary

Emergency Action Standard – CCR Title 8 Section 3220 (GISO California OSHA) – 29 CFR 1910.38 (GISO Federal OSHA)

 Who does it apply to:

All employers with ten or more employees

Major Standard Requirements:

  • Fire and Life Safety Inspection
  • Written Policies and Procedures Development
  • (Incident Command System)
  • Designated Individual Training
    • (CPR/First Aid, Bloodborne Pathogens*, Fire Extinguisher Use**, Facility Shut Down, HAZMAT Response, etc.)
  • Medical/Rescue/Emergency supplies and equipment required for first-aiders and rescue personnel
  • Initial Employee Orientation Training
  • Program Maintenance
    • Periodic Evacuation Drills (Recommend Quarterly)
    • Periodic Team Training

*            Must develop a Bloodborne Pathogens program as specified by CCR Title 8 Section 5193

**            All employees must participate in fire extinguisher training annually as specified by CCR Title 8 Section 6151 OR document in your Emergency Action Plan and enforce that ALL EMPLOYEES are to evacuate the facility in the event of a fire. No employee is to use a fire extinguisher.

Emergency Action Plan Documentation: (CCR Title 8 Section 3220)

This is the foundation of every company’s emergency action plan. The effectiveness of emergency response is everyone’s co-operation and assistance. Through the development of this document we will set the expectations and responsibilities of all personnel within your facility whether they are directly or indirectly assigned duties in the event of an emergency. Responsible Groups may include, but not be limited to, Incident Command, Facility Safety, First Aid response, Hazardous Material response, communications & recovery.

Fire Prevention Plan Documentation: (CCR Title 8 Section 3221)

Designed in concert with Emergency Action Plan. This is a required, proactive part of emergency preparedness. This plan will structure the inspection and abatement of fire related hazards within your facility. Personnel will be assigned duties within this plan.

Emergency Action Plan Implementation – Training for the designated individuals to help create a smoother transition for implementation of your program. This session involves all assigned personnel in a “round table” type setting to discuss their responsibilities, their concerns and potential modifications to the plan based on unrecognized hazards. We will also identify needs for additional emergency equipment and safety training. We will also help establish procedures for emergency drills and identify evacuation “Safe Zones”. Emergency Evacuation Map Development

Evacuation Map Development – OSTS can develop computer-designed maps of your facility which will display emergency equipment, routes of exit, Safe Zone(s), etc. We can develop maps free-hand draw or use electronic files of facility maps that you have already developed. Providing electronic files may reduce the overall cost of map development. Evacuation maps are NOT drawn to scale, they are drawn proportionally.

Emergency Action Plan Employee Orientation – Training for employees that are not assigned specific duties within the plan. Employees will be given an overview of the current plan of action and what is expected of them during a specific emergency (i.e. earthquake, fire, chemical release, etc.). Also, employees may be “Walked Through” their primary routes of exit and assembled at the safe zone (If time allows).

Machine Guarding

Machine Guarding

From an OSHA Safety perspective, machine guarding compliance is a high priority concern.  Typically, when injuries occur due to lack of compliant machine guarding, they tend to be significant.  As such, OSHA typically categorizes machine guarding violative conditions (citations) as Serious.  Serious citation items garner a much higher penalty amount.   In the State of California, Cal OSHA disallows a specific Employer defense when the lack of positive machine guarding was related to an accident-related citation.

Guarding Requirements are broken down into two major groups.  Those two groups are:

  • Points of Operation Guards and Other Hazardous Parts of Machinery

Machines that are operating under normal daily conditions that pose a grinding, shearing, punching, pressing, squeezing, drawing, cutting, rolling, mixing or similar action, in which an employee comes within the danger zone shall be guarded at the point of operation in one or a combination of the ways.

  • Power Transmission Equipment, Prime Movers, Machines and Machine Parts

All machines, parts of machines, or component parts of machines which create hazardous revolving, reciprocating, running, shearing, punching, pressing, squeezing, drawing, cutting, rolling, mixing or similar action, including pinch points and shear points, not guarded by the frame of the machine(s) or by location, shall be guarded.

OSTS solutions

Many of our clients rely on OSTS to conduct a facility-wide comprehensive inspection to help identify a global view of safety / OSHA compliance concerns, however, OSTS also offers hazard-focused inspections.   A hazard-focused inspection will be more cost-effective when the employer wants to tackle safety concerns in an individualized manner rather than a comprehensive manner.

As opposed to having OSTS directly identify machine guarding deficiencies and compliance issues, one of our consultants can provide classroom instruction that will empower students with knowledge of the OSHA machine guarding regulatory requirements as they apply to specific machinery and their points of operation AND moving parts and power transmission parts .  This training session will encompass an overview of general guarding requirements along with photo exercises that test the students observation skills as it relates to guarding deficiencies.

Machine safeguard training instruction combined with classroom discussion of site-specific examples may cause the class duration to fluctuate based on number of students.

Topics covered in the class:

  • Identifying Hazards
  • Controlling Hazards
  • Safeguarding Methods
  • Types of Guards
  • Types of Devices
  • Clothing & Jewelry Restrictions
  • How machine guarding correlates with lockout tagout procedures
  • Preventative Maintenance

Respiratory Protection

Respiratory Protection

 

CCR Title 8 Section 5144 (GISO Cal OSHA), 29 CFR 1910.134 (GISO Fed OSHA)

Learn More

Hearing Conservation

Hearing Conservation Standard

CCR Title 8 Sections 5095-5100 (GISO Cal OSHA), 29 CFR 1910.95 (GISO Fed OSHA)

 

Who does it apply to:

General Industry Employers

All employers whose employees are exposed to an excess of the OSHA Action Level for applicable noise levels (85 dbA, 8-hour TWA).

Additional requirements apply to those environments where employees are exposed to an excess of listed OSHA Permissible Exposure Limits (PEL) for applicable noise levels (90 dbA, 8-hour TWA).  The additional requirements for the employer are to conduct, documented evaluations of the feasibility of Engineering and/or Administrative controls to reduce employee noise exposures.

Construction Industry

The Hearing Conservation requirements do not apply, however, hearing protection plans must be implemented where employees are exposed to an excess of the listed OSHA PEL (90 dbA, 8-hour TWA).

Noise Dosimetry Surveys

If surveys determine exposures are in excess of 90dbA for an 8 hour TWA, then:

The Employer is REQUIRED to Evaluate the feasibility of engineering and / or administrative controls for noise reduction

If engineering controls are not feasible nor successful in reducing noise exposures to less than 85dbA 8TWA, Then the following are required for GISO Employers:

  • Written Policies and Procedures Development
  • Equipment Selection
    • (Different types, models and sizes required)
  • Affected Employee Baseline Audiometric Exams
  • Initial Employee Training
  • Program Maintenance
    • Effective Employee Re-Training (Annual)
    • Affected Employee Audiometric Exams (Annual)

-OR –

If surveys determine exposures are in excess of 85dbA, but less than 90dbA for an 8 hour TWA and voluntary engineering and / or administrative controls are not implemented, then:

  • Written Policies and Procedures Development
  • Equipment Selection
    • (Different types, models and sizes required)
  • Affected Employee Baseline Audiometric Exams
  • Initial Employee Training
  • Program Maintenance
    • Effective Employee Re-Training (Annual)
    • Affected Employee Audiometric Exams (Annual)

Heat Illness Prevention

Heat Illness Prevention Standard

CCR Title 8 Section 3395 and 3203 (GISO and CSO Cal OSHA), General Duty Clause (Fed OSHA)

 

Who does it apply to:

This section applies to all outdoor places of employment.

Additionally, Employers whose employees work in indoor environments where radiant heat sources and / or lack of sufficient ventilation may create excessive heat build up, need to address heat illness concerns via CCR Title 8 Section 3203.

Major Regulatory Requirements

  • Evaluation of specific job task / activity heat exposures
  • Develop written policies and procedures, include
    • Specific Procedures per each outside activity, duration, and workload
    • Specific procedures for shade and water provisioning, employee rest / recovery periods
    • Shade Equipment and water provision device selection / acquisition
    • High Heat Procedures when over 95
    • Emergency Response Procedures
  • Supervisor Training & Initial Employee Training

Training to include, at a minimum:

  • Environmental and personal risk factors
  • Employer’s heat illness prevention plan and procedures
  • The need to drink water frequently throughout the day
  • Importance of acclimatization—allowing the body to adjust gradually to work in high heat
  • Types of heat illness and the signs and symptoms
  • Necessity of immediately reporting to an employer any signs or symptoms
  • Employer’s procedures for responding to symptoms
  • Employer’s procedures for contacting emergency medical services, including alternative modes of transportation
  • Employer’s procedures for emergency communications, including emergency response procedures such as location, local medical services, and communication alternatives

Program Maintenance

  • Effective Employee re-training as required
  • Effective Supervisor re-training as required
  • Continual review of field operation compliance with shade and water provisioning.

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for head, hands, eyes, face, body

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

CCR Title 8 Section 3380 – 3385 (Cal OSHA), 29 CFR Subpart I (Fed OSHA) 

 This Checklist does NOT include Respiratory Protection, Noise exposure protection, or fall protection. Separate pages are provided for those topics.

Who does it apply to:

All employers whose employees who are required, and in some cases, voluntarily, to wear personal protective equipment to protect them from job-related hazards.  Ideally, PPE should be viewed as a last resort to protect employees from identified hazards.   Employers should first attempt to eliminate hazards via Engineering Controls, Administrative Controls, and/or Substitution.  If these controls are not feasible nor effective, then the employer should evaluate the need and effectiveness of PPE.

What are the major regulatory requirements

  • Documented / Certified evaluation of Personal Protective Equipment needs per job description.
  • Policy development. May be contained within your Injury and Illness Prevention Program policy.
  • Specific Requirements / Procedures per Job Description. Requirements for the proper use and maintenance of applicable PPE.
  • Equipment/Device Selection/Acquisition
  • Equipment Care and maintenance
  • Initial Employee Training
  • Program Maintenance
    • Effective Employee Re-Training as required
    • Annual review of PPE needs, use, and maintenance.

Blood borne Pathogens

Bloodborne Pathogen Standard

CCR Title 8 Section 5193 (Cal OSHA), 29 CFR 1910.1030 (Fed OSHA)

  Who does it apply to:

All employers who have employees that have a potential exposure to blood or bodily fluids as specified by job duties. (i.e. designated CPR/First Aiders, Maintenance personnel, janitorial staff, etc. – Affected Employees)

Major regulatory requirements of the Standard:

  • Conduct an Evaluation of Job Duties and Potential Employee Exposure
  • Develop Written Policies and Procedures
  • Provide Appropriate Personal Protective Equipment
  • Provide Proper Infectious Material Collection Devices
  • Conduct Universal Precautions Training for Designated Individuals
  • Conduct Awareness Training for General Population Employees
  • Make HBV Vaccination Available To Affected Employees
    • Periodic review of affected job descriptions
    • Evaluation of accident scene decontamination procedures
  • Effective Employee Re-Training (At Least Annual)

 

Fire Extinguisher Use

Fire Extinguisher Training

CCR Title 8 § 6151 (Cal OSHA), 29 CFR 1910.157

There are many requirement for Employers regarding portable fire extinguisher availability, maintenance, access, and employee use in the event of an emergency.  This page will focus on the employee training element.

The following are excerpts from the OSHA regulations:

Where the employer has provided portable fire extinguishers for employee use in the workplace, the employer shall also provide an educational program to familiarize employees with the general principles of fire extinguisher use and the hazards involved with incipient stage fire fighting.

The employer shall provide the education required upon initial employment and at least annually thereafter.

The employer shall provide employees who have been designated to use fire fighting equipment as part of an emergency action plan with training in the use of the appropriate equipment.

Basic Class

This course is all classroom lecture. Students will be given an in-depth presentation of fire characteristics, types of fires, proper equipment to be used and run through specific scenarios. Students completing this class will gain a comprehensive understanding of fire prevention and protection.

Basic Class and Demo

We also offer a more detailed course encompassing both the Demo and Basic class. Students will receive extensive classroom lecture and will participate in a (dry) demonstration . Maximum 25 students per class.

 

All training is performed in accordance with OSHA and other State Regulations and local Ordinances.

Back Injury Prevention

Back Injury Prevention

The purpose of the following information is to increase the awareness of the importance of practicing proper lifting techniques on a day-to-day basis. Most back injuries are caused by chronic exposure, not one-time incidents. The employer must be proactive and persistent in the correction of bad habits.

At the completion of our back injury prevention course students will understand several techniques that can be used to maintain a healthy back, via sizing up loads and properly judging limits, understanding the extreme forces placed on the back when not lifting correctly, and recognizing common pitfalls in everyday activities at work and home.

Course presentation may include: lecture, powerpoint, video, and/or student handouts.

All training is performed in accordance with Federal OSHA, applicable State-chartered OSHA, and other State Regulations and local Ordinances.

Department Of Transportation (DOT) Safety Training

The Instructor will address the following issues in a site-specific manner to ensure applicability of information. Our instructors not only cover the required elements but use tabletop and practical exercises to further enhance the value of the class.

HM 181 shipping, receiving and handling training requirements
(DOT HM126F / 215A)
This DOT regulation
requires specific training for all employees who ship, receive, manifest, handle and/or transport hazardous materials. All affected employees must be trained within 90 days of hire and provided refresher training, at least, every three years. This course will also cover the new Security regulations, under 49 CFR Part 172 Subpart I as required for all Hazardous material employees/drivers/handlers/shippers. This Class is approximately eight hours and certification is good for three years.

Topics that will be covered:

  • General definitions and terminology.
  • How to use the Hazardous Materials table
  • How to select the proper DOT Shipping description.
  • Shipping papers and manifesting.
  • Performance-oriented packaging requirements.
  • Handling “empties” and “leakers”.
  • Responding to emergency situations.
  • Security

Traffic control / Navigating Through the 2016 California Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Device’s (MUTCD)

This 6-7 hour, course is a must for the construction work zone, in both one and two person traffic control operations. Experienced traffic controllers can attend this course as a refresher. All attendees receive a certificate of course completion.

The primary objectives of the program (Part 6 of the 2016 MUTCD) is to train employees to provide safe passage of traffic through and around work areas and to minimize confusion by bringing standard procedures to our highways. Controlling traffic through work areas is one of the most important — and dangerous — operations in highway maintenance. This traffic control course is a comprehensive skill-building session that meets industry guidelines.

The topics covered include the following:

Requirements as specified in the “California Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices”, MUTCD, The Manual.

INSTRUCTIONAL COMPONENT

  • Part 1 – Introduction on how to Navigate the MUTCD
  • Part 2a – Signage
  • Part 2b – Warning Signs
    • Guidelines for advanced Placement of warning signs
  • Part 6 – Temporary Traffic Control
    1. 6a – General
    2. 6B – Fundamental Principles
    3. 6C – Temporary Traffic Control Elements
    4. 6D – Pedestrian and Worker Safety
    5. 6F – Temporary Traffic Control Zone Devices
    6. 6G – Typical Applications
    7. 6I – Control of Traffic Through Incident Management Areas
  • Part 7 – Traffic Control for School Areas
  • Part 10 – Traffic Control for Highway, Light Rail Transit Grade Crossings

NOISE DOSIMETER TESTING

Used to acquire true employee noise exposures. Same procedure OSHA would use to determine employee noise exposures.

This testing procedure will pin point the areas that require implementation of a Hearing Protection Policy including whether or not employees are REQUIRED to wear hearing protection.  OSTS will test a representative sample of employees / job descriptions and generate a report determining which employees / job descriptions are experiencing 90 dbA or above in the area for which they work.  This testing follows the requirement CCR Title 8 § 1521 and § 5096.

Note: Employees exposed to an excess of 90dbA averaged over an eight-hour period must participate in your Hearing Protection Policy requirements.

  • Testing must be done during peak production / anticipated highest noise exposures.
  • A representative sampling of the work environment is highly recommended to acquire the most accurate findings.

NOISE LEVEL METER READING
Used to get estimated, in-the-moment, samples of noise levels.

A consultant will use a certified instrument to measure the noise level within a certain area or department. This measurement will give a precise reading of the level of noise in that area or department during a particular moment in time. These readings can be useful to aid in determining those areas that may warrant noise dosimetry testing.

IATA Dangerous Goods Transportation (Air)

Three-Day Initial Training Seminar/Workshop

This seminar will cover General Philosophy, Limitations, and General requirements for shippers and carriers. Classification, list of Dangerous Goods, General packing requirements, Packing instructions. Labeling and Marking, Documentation. Basic acceptance, loading and handling procedures. Certification is good for two (2) years.

Introduction to the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations (DGR)

  • How to use the Dangerous Goods Regulations
  • Training requirements
  • Inspections
  • Penalties
  • Preparing a package to comply with both DOT and ICAO regulations

Classification of a Dangerous Good

 

  • How to classify and determine packing groups for dangerous goods
  • How to determine primary and subsidiary hazards
  • How to use the List of Dangerous Goods
  • How to choose a proper shipping name based on the IATA regulations
  • Special provisions for shipping by air

 

Packaging

General packaging requirements

  • State and operator variations
  • Limited quantity packing instructions
  • Passenger and cargo aircraft packing instructions
  • UN packaging codes
  • Marking and Labeling
  • Marks and labels required for limited quantities and excepted quantities
  • Marks and labels required for passenger and cargo aircraft shipments


Shipper’s Declaration of Dangerous Goods

  • How to fill out a Shipper’s Declaration of Dangerous Goods


Handling Dangerous Goods

 

  • Segregation of dangerous goods

 

IATA Dangerous Goods Transportation (Air)


Eight-hour Refresher Training Seminar/Workshop

This seminar will review the topics that were covered in the three-day seminar. General philosophy, limitations and general requirements for shippers and carriers. Classification, list of dangerous goods, general packing requirements, packing instructions. Labeling and marking, documentation. Basic acceptance, loading and handling procedures. Certification is good for two (2) years.

  • Introduction to the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations (DGR)
  • Classification of a Dangerous Good
  • Packaging
  • Shipper’s Declaration of Dangerous Goods
  • Handling Dangerous Goods

Industrial Hygiene Services

Industrial Hygiene (IH) services as related to OSHA requirements is the anticipation, recognition, evaluation, control and prevention of hazards from work that may result in injury, illness, or affect the well being of workers.

The types of hazards typically included in industrial hygiene include:

  • Biological,
  • Chemical,
  • Physical, and
  • Ergonomic

Industrial Hygiene hazard identification methods includes such services as:

  • Work area walk-throughs to assist in recognition and anticipation of potential health hazards
  • Noise Dosimetry,
  • Air Sampling,
  • Air Quality Surveys,
  • Lighting Studies

Common sampling / survey services include dust sampling (i.e. silica), gas / vapor (i.e. solvents, corrosives), air quality studies (i.e. mold, carbon monoxide), lighting studies (i.e. office and production environments), lead, and asbestos concerns.

OSTS can provide the services and oversight of a Certified Industrial Hygienist if so requested / required.

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